Dec 3: Donald Trump tweets misleading videos about Muslims and violence, and more

Executive Branch

Donald Trump retweeted three videos with captions indicating they depict violence by Muslims.

Two videos are clearly misleading: one of a Dutch boy kicking another boy, neither of whom are Muslims or migrants. Another depicts a struggle between factions supporting and opposing Egyptian ex-President Mohamed Morsi in which a boy is pushed off a roof. Both factions are Muslim.

The third shows the destruction of a Virgin Mary statue in Syria by a radical cleric in Jubhat al-Nusra, a Syrian militia linked with ISIS. The actions have been decried by Christians as well as Muslims, who mutually revere Mary.

The original tweets came from the leader of a far-right anti-Muslim group in the UK, Jayda Fransen. Fransen was convicted in 2016 of abusing a woman in a hijab, and is currently on bail over threatening language in a speech in August.

The organization, called Britain First, identifies itself as a party but is considered by some to be an extremist group, has gained notoriety for sensationalist mosque invasions.

Muslim leaders in the US have spoken out against the tweets, which they consider Islamophobic.

Melania Trump decorated the White House for the Christmas season, emphasizing the Christian holiday to comport with the administration’s “end to the war on Christmas.”

Community

A Pennsylvania woman won her bid to be exempted from fingerprinting for religious reasons. An appellate court overturned the ruling of a lower court that her beliefs were personal, rather than religious.

An in-depth article in Forward covered the dispute between a New Jersey town and a Hasidic Jewish community.

A New York City mother sued for full custody of her son, accusing her ex-husband of radicalizing the boy. The family is Muslim, but the mother contends the father adopted extremist ideas that have begun to rub off on his son.

Other reads

NPR reported on Christian nationalism exemplified by Roy Moore. Its proponents argue that rather than just guiding individuals’ decisions, Christianity should guide American laws and institutions.

Politico argued that a lack of Imams may result in more radicalization, as young Muslims turn to the Internet for religious guidance. Both Islamophobia and the difficulty of travel from Muslim countries have contributed to the shortage.

A Seton Hall Law Review article examined what happened to the number of religious freedom cases after Hobby Lobby. Belying the decision’s critics, there has not been a spike in claims related to religious protections.

Ross Douthat asked if the connection between Donald Trump and evangelicals will cause an evangelical crisis, particularly among younger adherents.

A new book examines legal and philosophic approaches to religious freedom around the world, in an attempt to identify a system that can balance the rights of religious and non-religious people.

An interesting article reviewed religious freedom cases during US history.

Nov 26: Research on family values, Democrats, Republicans and the prosperity gospel

Judicial Branch

The Washington Post argued that the embattled Peace Cross east of Washington, DC, should be allowed to stand. A federal court ruled last month that the monument to World War I casualties must be taken down because it is shaped like a religious icon.

Politics

The Atlantic argued that Democrats need to reach out to religious voters in order to succeed, which includes moderating some positions on religious freedom and social issues.

Brigham Young University and Deseret News released a survey on American families. One of the most interesting finds is that people who are less connected to their families are significantly more likely to have voted for Trump.

David Brooks explained how the “siege mentality” may be responsible for conservative and liberal retrenchment over social and political issues.

50 States 

Nicholas Kristof wrote about the family values that red states espouse but that are actually practiced by blue states (on average).

The Virginia Pilot ran a piece investigating the use of religious exemptions by daycares in the state to avoid oversight and regulations.

Community 

Attendance has increased at liberal churches since the 2016 election, with a lot of activists seeking like-minded faith communities.

Other reads

A panel at Harvard discussed the link between the prosperity gospel and the election of Donald Trump.

Analysis of survey data provided interesting information about who believes in prosperity theology – mostly the poor, and more Democrats than Republicans.

Nov 19: FBI stats show rise in hate crimes, profile of Trump’s pastor, and more

Executive Branch

The FBI released hate crime statistics for 2016. The total number increased by 4.6%, with 21% of hate crimes targeting religion – mostly against Jews. The number of anti-Muslim assaults exceeded even 2001 to reach a historic high. Crimes targeting Jews and LGBT people also rose. Advocates point out that many hate crimes go unreported, meaning the true numbers are likely much higher.

The Washington Post published an extensive profile of Paula White, a televangelist who appears to be Donald Trump’s pastor and who leads his unofficial evangelical advisory council. White has been associated with the prosperity gospel, a strain of Christian theology that believes that faith is rewarded with wealth.

The Department of Homeland Security’s head of faith-based and neighborhood partnerships resigned after past comments deriding Islam and black people surfaced on CNN.

Legislative Branch

Evangelicals remain divided over Roy Moore, the Alabama senator accused of sexual assault against minors.

50 States

The Jehovah’s Witnesses incurred heavier penalties for refusing to give documents on child abusers to a California court. They will now pay $4,000 per day that they continue to withhold the evidence.

Community

Muslim employees fired from UPS filed a religious discrimination lawsuit, saying they were let go after a new manager refused to allow them to pray during work hours.

A Connecticut middle school rescinded an invitation to a Muslim woman to speak to a social studies class after receiving threats.

Other reads

The Washington Post reviewed the new Museum of the Bible. The piece discusses what assumptions the museum makes and how it deals with controversial topics.

Oct 29: Missouri man wins sex discrimination suit, Catholic Charities sued, and more

Executive Branch

With the expiration of 120 days, the Trump administration announced that they will allow entry of refugees from all countries – including the Muslim-majority countries that had been banned – with additional screening.

The Department of Health and Human Services released a memo seeking comment on barriers to faith-based organizations’ participation in programs or reception of grants.

The Trump administration nominated a Brandeis professor who works to combat on-campus anti-Semitism as Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the Department of Education.

Judicial Branch

The Atlantic reported on the Hawaii judge who ruled against Trump’s travel bans, and his legal rationales – including violation of the establishment clause on religion.

50 States

A gay man in Missouri won a discrimination suit on the basis of sex. Although Missouri law does not prohibit discrimination due to sexual orientation, the judge ruled that the plaintiff’s mistreatment for acting “insufficiently masculine” is covered under the sex discrimination portion of the statute.

An Arizona couple lost a bid to remove a city ordinance prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The conservative Christian plaintiffs run a calligraphy business and are concerned about the possibility of being asked to write invitations for a same-sex wedding.

A North Dakota couple filed suit against Catholic Charities for refusing their application for adoption. The couple is lives together but is unmarried.

A Kentucky judge has resigned after announcing he would recuse himself from adoption cases involving gay people because of his religious beliefs. He had issued a general order to attorneys telling them to request a special judge if they were bringing such a case.

An Indiana judge ruled that preventing convicted sex offenders from attending church violates their religious freedom.

Community

The 31st undocumented immigrant to claim sanctuary at a house of worship did so at a Denver church on Thursday.

The Des Moines Register profiled an evangelical millennial working to persuade others that climate change is a real and important issue.

Other reads

A former CEO of NPR wrote a book on his experience immersing himself in Republican evangelical culture. He says he learned about religion, community service, gun control and other issues that often get short shrift in the media.

Former FBI Director James Comey revealed himself as the owner of a Twitter account named after theologian Reinhold Niebuhr. The Washington Post explained Niebuhr’s continued impact on American political life.

Oct 22: Sports and religion, travel ban blocked for Muslim discrimination, and more

Executive Branch

The Justice Department settled legal cases with a group of colleges who sought religious exemptions to the ACA’s contraception mandate.

A man was convicted of a federal hate crime for leaving a voicemail at a mosque threatening to shoot its members.

Politico published a piece contending that Trump represents an alliance between evangelical and nationalist conservatives.

Judicial Branch

A judge in Maryland blocked the new travel ban. He was preceded by a judge in Hawaii, but the new ruling is distinct for insisting that the policy changes in the ban have not eliminated religious discrimination against Muslims.

The Supreme Court confirmed a lower court’s ruling that a New Mexico town must remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from outside its city hall.

50 States

California Governor Jerry Brown vetoed legislation to prevent employers from punishing employees based on their reproductive health decisions. There was no religious exemption in the bill. Brown argued that these issues are already covered by state policies.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation began an effort to stop Oklahoma courts from ordering defendants to serve time at religious work camps. The camps are purportedly drug rehabilitation centers that involve unpaid labor at chicken processing plants and mandatory church attendance.

Sports

Religion and Politics explored the relationship between NFL religious ministries and the ongoing protests of racial inequality where players kneel during the national anthem.

A roundtable of basketball players discussed what it’s like to be Muslim in the NBA.

Community

A Museum of the Bible is set to open in November in Washington, DC. It is officially nonpartisan, but has drawn criticism from conservatives for omitting Jesus and from liberals for promoting a literalist evangelical interpretation of the Bible.

Other reads

The Atlantic discussed the use of the term “evil” as a framework to understand how conservative and liberal commentators understand morality differently.

Pew Research found that a majority of American adults now say it is not necessary to believe in God to be moral.

Oct 15: Trump speaks to Values Voters, Christian Hogwarts profiled

Executive Branch

Donald Trump spoke at the conservative Values Voter Summit. He listed the actions he’s taken that align with conservative Christian causes in both domestic and foreign policy, and committed to protect religious freedom.

Judicial Branch

A federal judge ruled that a tax exemption for housing clergy violates the establishment clause. She found that the exemption, passed in 1952, was unconstitutional because it provided a public benefit only available to members of the clergy.

A district court ruled that the US House Chaplain may bar an atheist from giving the congressional invocation. The atheist, who was invited by Mark Pocan (D-Wis), was informed that he did not meet the requirements that he be ordained by a recognized body in a faith he practices, and that the prayer address a higher power.

Other reads

Buzzfeed published an utterly fascinating article about a Bethel Church institution called “the School of Supernatural Ministry”that teaches Christian millennials how to prophesy and perform faith healing.

FiveThirtyEight compiled a summary of research indicating that college attendance does not reduce students’ religiosity.

Sep 17: Congress calls for Trump to denounce hate groups, Facebook advertises to anti-Semites

Legislative Branch

Congress passed a unanimous, joint resolution calling on the President to denounce racist and anti-Semitic hate groups.

Community

Until ProPublica broke the story, Facebook allowed advertisers to specifically target anti-Semitic users.

Following Pope Francis’ lead, Catholic leaders in the US started to frame other issues like climate change and immigration in the context of being “pro-life.”

Surveys

Some scholars disputed the PRRI survey that found a decline in the proportion of white evangelicals in America.

New research showed a dramatic turnaround in white evangelical opinions about politicians’ morality. In 2011, 60% said privately immoral politicians could not behave ethically in their public roles; in 2016, only 20% agreed.

ThinkProgress covered a study showing that Christian nationalists are more supportive of Donald Trump. Christian nationalists were identified as people who support policies like declaring the United States a Christian nation and allowing the display of religious symbols in public spaces.

A University of Pennsylvania survey on constitutional rights found that only 15% of Americans listed freedom of religion as a first amendment right. 20% of Americans believe that Muslims don’t share the same rights as other US citizens.

Sep 10: Trump advisory board supports DACA, judicial nominee questioned about Catholicism

Executive Branch

Religion News Service ran an extensive profile of Donald Trump’s informal Christian advisory group. He has given more access to religious leaders than any other modern president, but only includes evangelical Christian pastors. It’s unclear if they have had any effect on policy.

The advisory board is lobbying against the rollback of DACA, which grants legal status to undocumented immigrants who arrived as minors (“Dreamers”). Faith leaders across different traditions oppose deportation of Dreamers.

Churches in Houston sued FEMA because it excludes religious organizations from receiving public disaster assistance. Donald Trump tweeted his support for the churches’ cause.

Legislative Branch

A Catholic nominee for a federal judgeship was intensely questioned by the Senate over how judges should handle conflict between the law and their religious beliefs. She said that Democratic Senators misinterpreted an article she wrote as a law student about when Catholic judges should recuse themselves from cases involving moral questions.

Judicial Branch

Donald Trump nominated five judges in Texas, two of which spent part of their careers at the First Liberty Institute. First Liberty Institute is a conservative non-profit law firm that litigates religious liberty cases, and has been criticized by liberal groups and LGBT rights organizations.

Justice Department lawyers filed an amicus brief supporting the Denver baker who is being sued for refusing to make a custom wedding cake for a gay couple. They ask the Supreme Court to carve out a narrow exception to discrimination laws for expressive professions.

The 6th Circuit ruled that a Michigan county’s board meetings can continue to begin with prayers led by a commissioner.

Community

The National Cathedral removed stained glass windows picturing Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

Surveys

PRRI published a report based on the largest ever survey of American religious identity. It found that white evangelical Protestants are beginning to experience the same membership decline that other denominations began to see decades ago. Overall, white Christians are declining as a proportion of the population, down to 43% from 81% in 1976. The full report is here.

FiveThirtyEight analyzed what the survey data might mean for the future of political parties.

The Atlantic wrote about the people who report being religiously unaffiliated.

The 2017 Baylor Religion Survey results were also released. They focus on the intersection of Trump support with religion, the use of technology, and the role of faith in mental health.

Other reads

An interesting article discussed the Doctrine of Christian Discovery underpinning the legal justification of land seizure from Native Americans.

JSTOR examined the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster and what religious authenticity means.

Sep 3: Day of Prayer for Houston, Travel Ban Affects Hajj

Executive Branch

Donald Trump declared September 3rd as a National Day of Prayer for victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Muslims in Saudi Arabia for the hajj expressed concern about reentering the US under the Trump travel ban. Many Muslims chose to delay their pilgrimage until the situation is more certain.

The State Department announced a consolidation of positions and offices related to religion and religious freedom. The special envoy on anti-Semitism will remain, but the envoys to Muslim communities and the Organization of Islamic Countries will be discontinued.

Judicial Branch

The 8th Circuit upheld a lower court’s ruling that Lincoln, Nebraska, can ban the distribution of religious literature outside of a sports arena.

50 States

Illinois passed a law creating a Muslim American Advisory Council.

Community

The New York Times ran a profile of an Arkansas man who helped vandalize a Mosque and the Muslim community leaders who forgave him.

Other reads

The Wheatley Institution at BYU posted about social science research that indicates a positive relationship between religiosity and family life, including quality of fatherhood and outcomes for children.

A Pew survey found that Protestants have started to believe some of the same Catholic theological tenets that prompted the Reformation. Key among these is the role of works in salvation and the doctrinal validity of extra-scriptural church teachings.

Aug 27: SPLC sued by Christian ministry over hate group label, Justice Department downplays religious freedom EO

Judicial Branch

The Southern Poverty Law Center is well known for its documentation of hate groups. Its profiles of white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups have been widely cited in coverage of the Charlottesville violence.

The SPLC created a controversy this last year by including Christian organizations in its list of hate groups because of their opposition to same-sex relationships. This last week the SPLC was sued by a Presbyterian ministries company in a federal court for defamation because it listed the company as a hate group.

The SPLC lists are used by other companies, like Amazon and charity tracker Guidestar, to blacklist organizations that support causes of hate.

The 9th Circuit ruled against a public high school football coach who lost his position after continuing to pray on the field after games.

A federal judge granted a pipeline company access to land owned by an order of Catholic nuns. The nuns had argued that as part of their order of Adorers of Christ, they must preserve the sacredness of the earth. The judge ruled that they failed to demonstrate how the pipeline would disrupt the practice of their religion.

Executive Branch

The Justice Department defended Donald Trump’s executive order on religious freedom by saying it actually didn’t change anything.

The Justice Department also filed briefs defending the ACA birth control mandate and the Johnson Amendment prohibiting religious endorsement of political candidates, despite Trump’s executive orders not to enforce those same laws.

A group of Jewish leaders decided to cancel an annual call with the White House because of Donald Trump’s statements about the conservative rallies and violence in Charlottesville, which included public demonstrations of anti-Semitism.

Members of Trump’s evangelical advisory council resisted strong pressure to resign in the wake of his comments about Charlottesville.

50 States

A Wisconsin court ruled that a Christian photographer who does not work at same-sex weddings did not violate anti-discrimination laws because she does not have a physical storefront.

A devil-worshipping couple filed suit against an Oklahoma school district for religious discrimination against their children. The couple follows Anramainyu, a form of Zoroastrian devil worship.

Community

Muslim groups are turning to Jewish organizations to learn how to protect themselves from hate crimes. Mosque and Islamic center security is a particular focus.