Nov 26: Research on family values, Democrats, Republicans and the prosperity gospel

Judicial Branch

The Washington Post argued that the embattled Peace Cross east of Washington, DC, should be allowed to stand. A federal court ruled last month that the monument to World War I casualties must be taken down because it is shaped like a religious icon.

Politics

The Atlantic argued that Democrats need to reach out to religious voters in order to succeed, which includes moderating some positions on religious freedom and social issues.

Brigham Young University and Deseret News released a survey on American families. One of the most interesting finds is that people who are less connected to their families are significantly more likely to have voted for Trump.

David Brooks explained how the “siege mentality” may be responsible for conservative and liberal retrenchment over social and political issues.

50 States 

Nicholas Kristof wrote about the family values that red states espouse but that are actually practiced by blue states (on average).

The Virginia Pilot ran a piece investigating the use of religious exemptions by daycares in the state to avoid oversight and regulations.

Community 

Attendance has increased at liberal churches since the 2016 election, with a lot of activists seeking like-minded faith communities.

Other reads

A panel at Harvard discussed the link between the prosperity gospel and the election of Donald Trump.

Analysis of survey data provided interesting information about who believes in prosperity theology – mostly the poor, and more Democrats than Republicans.

Nov 19: FBI stats show rise in hate crimes, profile of Trump’s pastor, and more

Executive Branch

The FBI released hate crime statistics for 2016. The total number increased by 4.6%, with 21% of hate crimes targeting religion – mostly against Jews. The number of anti-Muslim assaults exceeded even 2001 to reach a historic high. Crimes targeting Jews and LGBT people also rose. Advocates point out that many hate crimes go unreported, meaning the true numbers are likely much higher.

The Washington Post published an extensive profile of Paula White, a televangelist who appears to be Donald Trump’s pastor and who leads his unofficial evangelical advisory council. White has been associated with the prosperity gospel, a strain of Christian theology that believes that faith is rewarded with wealth.

The Department of Homeland Security’s head of faith-based and neighborhood partnerships resigned after past comments deriding Islam and black people surfaced on CNN.

Legislative Branch

Evangelicals remain divided over Roy Moore, the Alabama senator accused of sexual assault against minors.

50 States

The Jehovah’s Witnesses incurred heavier penalties for refusing to give documents on child abusers to a California court. They will now pay $4,000 per day that they continue to withhold the evidence.

Community

Muslim employees fired from UPS filed a religious discrimination lawsuit, saying they were let go after a new manager refused to allow them to pray during work hours.

A Connecticut middle school rescinded an invitation to a Muslim woman to speak to a social studies class after receiving threats.

Other reads

The Washington Post reviewed the new Museum of the Bible. The piece discusses what assumptions the museum makes and how it deals with controversial topics.

May 7: Executive Order on religious freedom changes little

Executive Branch

On National Prayer Day, Thursday of last week, Donald Trump signed an executive order on religious freedom. It instructed the IRS not to pursue churches that endorsed candidates, and allows religious exemptions under the Affordable Care Act requirements around contraception.

In practice, the order changes little – the IRS has never really enforced the Johnson Amendment preventing church endorsement of politicians, and the Hobby Lobby case already established a precedent for a religious exemption to the ACA contraception mandate.

The executive order drew swift support and criticism from the usual sides, although after reading the actual text some reversed their criticism and said the EO doesn’t really matter.

The President’s remarks at the signing caused some consternation among the military after he claimed, incorrectly, that service members were prevented from receiving religious items in a hospital that they had requested.

Legislative Branch

The Republican healthcare bill may draw logic from the “Prosperity Gospel,” which believes that good people are blessed with prosperity. The bill would allow insurance companies to price discriminate between sicker and healthier people, perhaps under the assumption that they are responsible for their health outcomes and should pay accordingly.

The Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the recent spike in religious hate crimes. The panel of witnesses addressed hate against Jewish, Sikh and other communities, but was criticized for the absence of Muslim witnesses.

Judicial Branch

The 8th Circuit upheld a ruling against a heroin dealer who claimed his religion involved the distribution of narcotics. The court pointed out that, unlike other religions that incorporate drug use, the defendant made no argument that his buyers were also believers.

50 States

The Muslim doctors charged in the female genital mutilation case in Michigan intend to mount a religious freedom defense.

A Kentucky judge permanently recused himself from any adoption cases involving gay couples, citing a conscientious objection to adoptions by same-sex couples. Critics contend that an inability to be impartial on this question may mean he is unfit to hear any cases.

A Charlotte lawsuit examines if religious freedom can protect a pastor against defamation suits for things he said over the pulpit.

Other reads

The Washington Post asks if the Democratic party can include candidates who oppose abortion.

Esquire has a profile on Reverend William Barber, the activist preacher opposing Trump who has been called “the closest person we have to Martin Luther King Jr.”

 

Jan 22: Religious Freedom Review, inauguration edition

Executive Branch

President Obama declared last Monday, January 16, to be Religious Freedom Day in addition to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Controversy arose over Reverend Robert Jeffress’ participation in the customary service attended by the Trumps Friday morning. Jeffress, a Southern Baptist, gained notoriety for his remarks about minority groups – particularly comments about Mitt Romney during the 2012 election. His sermon was taken from Nehemiah and focused on God’s support for “building the wall” around Jerusalem.

Donald Trump’s inauguration had the most prayers in US history, with three invocations and three benedictions. They were given by the first female clergy to pray at an inauguration, a Hispanic evangelical, an African-American pastor, Franklin Graham, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, and a rabbi. The Christians were all evangelicals and two are associated with the resurgent “prosperity gospel” theology.

On his first full day in office, President Trump attended the traditional prayer service at the National Cathedral with representation from 26 faiths. Most were evangelical, but Islam, Baha’i, Navajo and other minority religious were also represented.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case testing a Blaine amendment in Missouri. Blaine amendments, which put restrictions on government funds going to churches, were passed in many states in the 19th century on a wave of anti-Catholic sentiment. This case concerns the state’s denial of Trinity Lutheran Church of Missouri’s application for a public grant to used recycled tires on its playground.

50 States

Texas Supreme Court reversed a previous decision by agreeing to hear a case seeking to halt benefits to the same-sex spouses of city employees in Houston.

Nebraska is looking to overturn a ban on teachers wearing religious garb.

Illinois community college found not to violate student’s religious rights after removing him from his paramedic class because his religious beliefs prevented him from being vaccinated.

Local

A Muslim convert fired from her job at a New Jersey jail for wearing a headscarf lost her appeal. The court found that she was not being discriminated against, as accommodating the headscarf would be an undue hardship on the jail.

Amish men sue the city of Auburn, Kentucky, over a requirement for horses to wear “equine diapers,” which they say violates their religious beliefs.

Other Reads

A review of Obama’s frequent discussions of his personal faith, and particularly of Christian theology: “Theologian in Chief.”