Nov 26: Research on family values, Democrats, Republicans and the prosperity gospel

Judicial Branch

The Washington Post argued that the embattled Peace Cross east of Washington, DC, should be allowed to stand. A federal court ruled last month that the monument to World War I casualties must be taken down because it is shaped like a religious icon.

Politics

The Atlantic argued that Democrats need to reach out to religious voters in order to succeed, which includes moderating some positions on religious freedom and social issues.

Brigham Young University and Deseret News released a survey on American families. One of the most interesting finds is that people who are less connected to their families are significantly more likely to have voted for Trump.

David Brooks explained how the “siege mentality” may be responsible for conservative and liberal retrenchment over social and political issues.

50 States 

Nicholas Kristof wrote about the family values that red states espouse but that are actually practiced by blue states (on average).

The Virginia Pilot ran a piece investigating the use of religious exemptions by daycares in the state to avoid oversight and regulations.

Community 

Attendance has increased at liberal churches since the 2016 election, with a lot of activists seeking like-minded faith communities.

Other reads

A panel at Harvard discussed the link between the prosperity gospel and the election of Donald Trump.

Analysis of survey data provided interesting information about who believes in prosperity theology – mostly the poor, and more Democrats than Republicans.

Jun 18: Hand scanner and the mark of the devil, Lyle Jeffs arrested

Judicial Branch

The Fourth Circuit ruled in favor of a Christian coal miner who objected to his company’s use of a biometric hand scanner. He believes the scanner imparts the Mark of the Beast from the Book of Revelation. The company accommodated two employees with hand injuries but refused to give an exception to the plaintiff, so he left the company. The employer’s defense argued that the plaintiff’s interpretation of the Bible was incorrect, and should have allowed him to use his left hand.

The Supreme Court case last week exempting religious hospital systems from pension regulations didn’t fully resolve the issue. The Court ruled that “principal-purpose” organizations qualify for an exemption, but did not address whether or not the plaintiffs qualified as principal-purpose organizations.

Executive Branch

Lyle Jeffs, leader of the Fundamentalist Latter-Day Saints, was captured by the FBI after a year on the run. He is wanted in connection with a food stamp fraud case. Jeffs is the younger brother of Warren Jeffs, his predecessor as leader of the polygamist Mormon sect.

President Trump’s proposed tax reforms could significantly reduce charitable giving, including to religious organizations.

Other reads

A new paper breaks down political affiliations of clergy across faiths. It finds that the clergy are more partisan than their members.

The LA Times ran a story about what it is like to live as a Sikh at a time when they are increasingly targeted in hate crimes.