Jun 11: Marches against Sharia, Supreme Court upholds pension exception for religious hospitals

National

ACT for America, a conservative national security grassroots organization, staged Marches Against Sharia across the US on Saturday. The group was protesting the supposed infiltration of Islamic law into American jurisprudence.

That claim – along with others touted by marchers, such as wild accusations of bestiality – is refuted by experts.

Most cities with marches saw counter-protests calling for tolerance and condemning ACT as Islamophobic.  A number of protests got physical and arrests were made in several states.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court ruled 8-0 in favor of religious hospital systems claiming exemptions from federal pension fund requirements. They were being sued by former employees who argued that the hospital networks should have complied with the ERISA law protecting employees with pension plans.

The Supreme Court declined to hear a religious freedom suit filed by a Marine. After being court-martialed on several offenses, she appealed over her conviction for disobeying orders to remove bible verses from her desk. Lower courts ruled against her.

Executive Branch

President Trump spoke at the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a conservative evangelical political organization. He said that he and evangelicals are under siege, and touted his Supreme Court nomination and executive orders on religion as steps in the right direction.

The Atlantic ran a profile of the man running the Health and Human Services Office of Civil Rights. He is religious, conservative, and the son of Colombian immigrants. His office oversees language, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation cases related to healthcare.

Secretary Ben Carson spoke at the Religious Liberty Dinner at the Newseum Institute’s Religious Freedom Center. He discussed the rights of private citizens and businesses to act according to their beliefs.

Congress

Bernie Sanders drew attention for his intense questioning at a senate confirmation hearing. He argued that the belief that members of other religions are condemned before God makes a nominee unable to serve all Americans fairly.

50 States

A District Court in Florida ruled against a Christian school that was denied the use of a stadium loudspeaker to broadcast prayers at a football championship game. The school claimed that freedoms of speech and religion were violated, while the court held that allowing use of the loudspeaker would have been state endorsement of religion.

A Montana court struck down a state rule eliminating tax credits for donations to religious school scholarships.

Other reads

Number of megachurches by state.

Apr 30: President Trump’s first 100 days see greater religious intolerance

President Trump

In his first 100 days, President Trump has kept some of his promises related to religion, religious freedom and the separation of church and state. His supporters hope the remainder will be fulfilled shortly.

The Anti-Defamation League said anti-Semitic acts have increased by 86% since Trump was elected.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations said Islamophobic incidents at US borders have increased by 1,035% in the first 100 days of the Trump presidency

Trump spoke at the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day event in the Capitol, condemning anti-Semitism in his remarks. The well-regarded speech was an important opportunity to mend relations with the Jewish community after criticism during the campaign and his first months in office.

New research from Pew indicates that white evangelicals who regularly attend church are twice as supportive of Trump as the general population.

Executive Branch

Trump may nominate Richard Grenell, a longtime US spokesman at the UN and foreign policy operative, as NATO Ambassador. It is unclear how Trump’s base will perceive Grenell, who is a gay man and a staunch evangelical Christian.

A Sikh man’s multi-year effort to join the Army may have been an important factor in the recent changes allowing soldiers to get permanent accommodations for religious dress and grooming.

Judicial Branch

A group of Mormon scholars filed an amicus brief against Trump’s immigration ban. It uses the precedent of federal discrimination against LDS immigrants in the 19th century.

50 States

Alabama passed legislation allowing adoption agencies to maintain faith-based policies on child placement. In particular, this allows religious agencies to not place children with same-sex couples.

The Amish countersued the government of Minnesota for fines and other sanctions leveled against them as a result of their refusal to install sewage systems.

Community

The San Diego Public School District created a plan for combating bullying and harassment of Muslim students.

Israel indicted the Israel-American teenager who earned money on the dark web by robocalling bomb threats into Jewish organizations in the US.

Other Reads

A high-profile prosecution of a Muslim physician who performed female genital cutting “procedures” on two Muslim girls in Michigan has prompted questions about whether the practice is religious or not. The Religious News Service has a thorough explanation. (Warning: explicit verbal content).

Progressive churches in Montana sponsoring refugees have encountered strong pushback from more conservative congregations.

The media/blogosphere has been discussing the possible rise or inevitable decline of a “religious left.” The Auburn Seminary in New York organizes politically liberal faith leaders to work for progressive causes.

Apr 9: Gorsuch confirmed to Supreme Court, House hearing on 1st Amendment at college

Judicial Branch

The Senate confirmed Neil Gorsuch to fill Antonin Scalia’s vacant Supreme Court seat. Republicans used the “nuclear option,” permanently altering Senate rules to circumvent a filibuster of a Supreme Court nominee. This effectively reduced the number of votes required to confirm a Supreme Court nominee from 60 to 51.

Gorsuch will have an immediate impact on the court as it decides high-profile cases, including several on religion.

The 7th Circuit ruled that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT individuals from workplace discrimination. It found that Kimberly Hively was illegally passed over for a full-time job because of her sexual orientation.

The ruling is at odds with an 11th Circuit ruling from March that found no legal protection for a security guard who was fired for her sexual orientation.

Legislative Branch

The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the First Amendment on college campuses. It included a testimony on restrictions of religious freedom, particularly regarding religious clubs and their ability to apply religious tests for membership or leadership roles.

Executive Branch

The Department of Justice’s new crime reduction task force will have a subcommittee on preventing hate crimes. Reported hate crimes have spiked in the past year, including a 67% increase in hate crimes against Muslim Americans.

The Trump Administration has still not made appointments to high-profile positions related to religion. These include the Office of Faith-Based and Community Partnerships and the Ambassador-at-Large for Religious Freedom.

50 States

The Washington Supreme Court remanded a case for retrial because of improperly handling of religion and sexual orientation in child custody. The parents concerned raised their children as conservative Christians, which led to conflict when the mother came out as lesbian and they divorced. The higher court held that Washington case law disallows the use of the mother’s sexual orientation in custody determinations, independent of any potential conflict with the children’s religious convictions.

Montana governor Steve Bullock vetoed legislation banning foreign laws from being used in the Montana court system. Although the bill did not mention Sharia law, the debate in the legislature indicated that banning Islamic jurisprudence was one of its primary intentions.

The Arkansas legislature passed a similar piece of legislation implicitly banning Sharia law by forbidding the use of foreign laws.