Jun 11: Marches against Sharia, Supreme Court upholds pension exception for religious hospitals

National

ACT for America, a conservative national security grassroots organization, staged Marches Against Sharia across the US on Saturday. The group was protesting the supposed infiltration of Islamic law into American jurisprudence.

That claim – along with others touted by marchers, such as wild accusations of bestiality – is refuted by experts.

Most cities with marches saw counter-protests calling for tolerance and condemning ACT as Islamophobic.  A number of protests got physical and arrests were made in several states.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court ruled 8-0 in favor of religious hospital systems claiming exemptions from federal pension fund requirements. They were being sued by former employees who argued that the hospital networks should have complied with the ERISA law protecting employees with pension plans.

The Supreme Court declined to hear a religious freedom suit filed by a Marine. After being court-martialed on several offenses, she appealed over her conviction for disobeying orders to remove bible verses from her desk. Lower courts ruled against her.

Executive Branch

President Trump spoke at the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a conservative evangelical political organization. He said that he and evangelicals are under siege, and touted his Supreme Court nomination and executive orders on religion as steps in the right direction.

The Atlantic ran a profile of the man running the Health and Human Services Office of Civil Rights. He is religious, conservative, and the son of Colombian immigrants. His office oversees language, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation cases related to healthcare.

Secretary Ben Carson spoke at the Religious Liberty Dinner at the Newseum Institute’s Religious Freedom Center. He discussed the rights of private citizens and businesses to act according to their beliefs.

Congress

Bernie Sanders drew attention for his intense questioning at a senate confirmation hearing. He argued that the belief that members of other religions are condemned before God makes a nominee unable to serve all Americans fairly.

50 States

A District Court in Florida ruled against a Christian school that was denied the use of a stadium loudspeaker to broadcast prayers at a football championship game. The school claimed that freedoms of speech and religion were violated, while the court held that allowing use of the loudspeaker would have been state endorsement of religion.

A Montana court struck down a state rule eliminating tax credits for donations to religious school scholarships.

Other reads

Number of megachurches by state.

Apr 30: President Trump’s first 100 days see greater religious intolerance

President Trump

In his first 100 days, President Trump has kept some of his promises related to religion, religious freedom and the separation of church and state. His supporters hope the remainder will be fulfilled shortly.

The Anti-Defamation League said anti-Semitic acts have increased by 86% since Trump was elected.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations said Islamophobic incidents at US borders have increased by 1,035% in the first 100 days of the Trump presidency

Trump spoke at the annual Holocaust Remembrance Day event in the Capitol, condemning anti-Semitism in his remarks. The well-regarded speech was an important opportunity to mend relations with the Jewish community after criticism during the campaign and his first months in office.

New research from Pew indicates that white evangelicals who regularly attend church are twice as supportive of Trump as the general population.

Executive Branch

Trump may nominate Richard Grenell, a longtime US spokesman at the UN and foreign policy operative, as NATO Ambassador. It is unclear how Trump’s base will perceive Grenell, who is a gay man and a staunch evangelical Christian.

A Sikh man’s multi-year effort to join the Army may have been an important factor in the recent changes allowing soldiers to get permanent accommodations for religious dress and grooming.

Judicial Branch

A group of Mormon scholars filed an amicus brief against Trump’s immigration ban. It uses the precedent of federal discrimination against LDS immigrants in the 19th century.

50 States

Alabama passed legislation allowing adoption agencies to maintain faith-based policies on child placement. In particular, this allows religious agencies to not place children with same-sex couples.

The Amish countersued the government of Minnesota for fines and other sanctions leveled against them as a result of their refusal to install sewage systems.

Community

The San Diego Public School District created a plan for combating bullying and harassment of Muslim students.

Israel indicted the Israel-American teenager who earned money on the dark web by robocalling bomb threats into Jewish organizations in the US.

Other Reads

A high-profile prosecution of a Muslim physician who performed female genital cutting “procedures” on two Muslim girls in Michigan has prompted questions about whether the practice is religious or not. The Religious News Service has a thorough explanation. (Warning: explicit verbal content).

Progressive churches in Montana sponsoring refugees have encountered strong pushback from more conservative congregations.

The media/blogosphere has been discussing the possible rise or inevitable decline of a “religious left.” The Auburn Seminary in New York organizes politically liberal faith leaders to work for progressive causes.

Mar 19: New travel ban blocked on religious freedom grounds

Executive Branch

Trump national security advisor Sebastian Gorka was alleged to be a member of a Nazi-allied group in his native Hungary.

Judicial Branch

President Trump’s new, revised travel ban has been blocked by courts in Hawaii and Maryland. Both courts found that previous administration statements provide clear evidence that the ban is intended to target Muslims, which is a violation of the first amendment’s establishment clause. Lawfare has an in-depth legal analysis of this argument.

Five 9th Circuit judges wrote a dissenting opinion criticizing the block on the original travel ban, arguing that the executive branch has the power to stop admission of aliens to the US.

A 3-judge panel on the 11th Circuit ruled against a fired lesbian security guard. The decision stated that the law does not protect individuals from discrimination based on their sexual orientation.

Community

Sanctuary churches are at risk of prosecution for harboring illegal alien.

Life has changed for Latino Muslims under the Trump administration.

A Pennsylvania pastor was charged with medical neglect leading to the death of his granddaughter. The sect he leads eschews medical treatment in favor of faith-based healing, and has been linked to dozens of child deaths over decades. This is the first time one of its leaders has been charged.

 

A Jewish court ruled that a new Jewish-owned pizzeria could not serve the same type of pizza as a neighboring, preexisting restaurant. The rabbinical decision was issued in Hebrew and Aramaic and drew on a Jewish law preventing unfair competition.

Other reads

An explanation for why some evangelical Christians in America feel like they’re under attack.

CNN gives a thorough analysis of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch’s religious background and its manifestation in his writings.

The Atlantic discusses America’s growing secularism and how it is exacerbating partisan politics. Less religious people appear to be more politically extreme.

Mar 5: Hate crimes across America, South Dakota passes religious adoption bill

Executive Branch

Reports emerged that President Trump still plans to sign a version of the draft executive order on religious freedom that was circulated last month. It is now being refined after challenges to other executive order in the courts. Its most controversial component exempts businesses from being required to serve LGBT individuals.

The church of Sam Rodriguez Jr, an evangelical pastor who prayed at Donald Trump’s inauguration, is offering sanctuary to congregants who fear raids by immigration authorities may lead to their deportation. In related news, the ICE staked out a church homeless shelter in Virginia, worrying religious organizations participating in the sanctuary movement.

Judicial Branch

A flurry of amicus briefs have been filed by religious groups on both sides of the upcoming Supreme Court case on the use of male restrooms by a transgender high school student.

Legal arguments continued over whether Sioux religious beliefs could halt the Dakota Access Pipeline under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

A Hare Krishna community in Western Virginia reached an agreement with Energy Transfer Partners over a pipeline crossing their land. ETP, the same company building the Dakota Access Pipeline, will reroute the pipeline to avoid certain sites sacred to the community, but it will still cross Hare Krishna land.

50 States

South Dakota passed legislation shielding religious adoption agencies from state penalties for refusing to place children with same-sex couples and single parents on religious grounds.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation has been sued for refusing to hire a Seventh-Day Adventist prison guard because of her religious requirement to abstain from work on the Sabbath.

Community

Bomb threats continued to target Jewish Community Centers. Interactive map of the 91 incidents (as of Sunday) here.

Four mosques have been burned down across the country in the last six weeks.

A Sikh man in Washington and two Hindu Indian immigrants in Kansas were shot in separate incidents apparently after being mistaken for Muslim immigrants.

Other Reads

NPR gave a fair analysis of the ongoing conflict between freedom of religion and the prevention of LGBT discrimination.

The numbers on refugee entry during the immigration ban, with fewer Muslim refugees than previously.

Jan 22: Religious Freedom Review, inauguration edition

Executive Branch

President Obama declared last Monday, January 16, to be Religious Freedom Day in addition to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Controversy arose over Reverend Robert Jeffress’ participation in the customary service attended by the Trumps Friday morning. Jeffress, a Southern Baptist, gained notoriety for his remarks about minority groups – particularly comments about Mitt Romney during the 2012 election. His sermon was taken from Nehemiah and focused on God’s support for “building the wall” around Jerusalem.

Donald Trump’s inauguration had the most prayers in US history, with three invocations and three benedictions. They were given by the first female clergy to pray at an inauguration, a Hispanic evangelical, an African-American pastor, Franklin Graham, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, and a rabbi. The Christians were all evangelicals and two are associated with the resurgent “prosperity gospel” theology.

On his first full day in office, President Trump attended the traditional prayer service at the National Cathedral with representation from 26 faiths. Most were evangelical, but Islam, Baha’i, Navajo and other minority religious were also represented.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case testing a Blaine amendment in Missouri. Blaine amendments, which put restrictions on government funds going to churches, were passed in many states in the 19th century on a wave of anti-Catholic sentiment. This case concerns the state’s denial of Trinity Lutheran Church of Missouri’s application for a public grant to used recycled tires on its playground.

50 States

Texas Supreme Court reversed a previous decision by agreeing to hear a case seeking to halt benefits to the same-sex spouses of city employees in Houston.

Nebraska is looking to overturn a ban on teachers wearing religious garb.

Illinois community college found not to violate student’s religious rights after removing him from his paramedic class because his religious beliefs prevented him from being vaccinated.

Local

A Muslim convert fired from her job at a New Jersey jail for wearing a headscarf lost her appeal. The court found that she was not being discriminated against, as accommodating the headscarf would be an undue hardship on the jail.

Amish men sue the city of Auburn, Kentucky, over a requirement for horses to wear “equine diapers,” which they say violates their religious beliefs.

Other Reads

A review of Obama’s frequent discussions of his personal faith, and particularly of Christian theology: “Theologian in Chief.”