May 28: Donald Trump tours world religions, wave of religious freedom legislation in Texas

Executive Branch

Donald Trump visited Riyadh, Jerusalem and Vatican City this week. Despite past controversies around his views on Islam, Judaism and the Pope, the trip was genial and has sparked little criticism.

The Pope gave him some reading material, and he was the first sitting president to visit the Western Wall.

Trump gave an important speech in Saudi Arabia, where he struck a different tone on Islam, calling it “one of the world’s great faiths.” Secretary of State Tillerson explained this rhetorical shift as an evolution in Trump’s views about Islam, while American Muslims remain skeptical that it indicates any change of heart.

Rex Tillerson himself made Islam-related news this week. He is breaking with an 18-year tradition by not hosting a public event to mark the end of Ramadan in late June.

As expected, Castilla Gingrich was nominated as the US Ambassador to the Vatican.

50 States

The Texas governor signed legislation into law protecting religious sermons from government subpoena. The bill was prompted by 2014 subpoenas for the sermons of pastors opposing an anti-discrimination ordinance in Houston.

Texas also passed legislation allowing religious organizations that do adoption and foster care matching to refuse to place children with non-Christian, unmarried or gay prospective parents.

Finally, Texas passed a bill requiring its Supreme Court to establish rules about the application of foreign laws to family law cases. This appears to be part of a national conservative campaign to “ban Sharia law.”

The Indiana Supreme Court ruled against a man using religious freedom as a justification for not paying taxes.

Judicial Branch

The 4th Circuit ruled against the Trump Administration’s travel ban, finding that it appeared to target Muslims.

Community

A white supremacist killed two people on an Oregon train who were trying to stop his verbal abuse of two Muslim women.

Two religious discrimination suits have been filed about accommodation of the wearing of long skirts – in a gym and in a hospital.

Other reads

Last Sunday’s 60 Minutes was about the 800+ religious institutions offering sanctuary to immigrants being sought by ICE.

The Guardian argues that the US is only a few decades behind Europe in secularization.

May 21: Samuel Alito on religious freedom, Clock Boy loses discrimination case

Judicial Branch

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito spoke at a seminary graduation on Wednesday, touching on religion and the first amendment. The Catholic school’s blog also interviewed him about his perspective on religious freedom.

A District Court dismissed Ahmed Mohamed’s discrimination lawsuit. Mohamed gained attention as “Clock Boy” when he was arrested at his high school after his homemade clock was mistaken for a bomb. The judge dismissed the lawsuit saying that religious and ethnic discrimination was not proved by the plaintiffs.

A District Court in California ruled against animal rights advocates suing a Jewish group. The group practices Kapparot, a ritual where a chicken is swung around the head while alive, then slaughtered and donated to the needy.  The advocates unsuccessfully argued against animal sacrifice for solely religious purposes.

Executive Branch

President Trump is on an ambitious trip to Saudi Arabia, Israel and Vatican City, where he will meet with religious leaders from three major world religions.

The White House plans to nominate Callista Gingrich, wife of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, as ambassador to the Vatican. The Gingriches are devout Catholics

A legacy court case over FBI surveillance of Mosques may impact the ongoing challenge to President Trump’s travel ban. If a ruling comes down soon, it will set precedent that may guide the 9th Circuit in deciding if the travel ban was discriminatory.

50 States + territories

The Kansas Court of Appeals ruled against a mother who claimed that the state’s use of a religious organization for child placement services violated the separation of church and state.

A new law in Puerto Rico will take effect on May 25th. For the first time, employers in the territory will be required to reasonably accommodate employees’ religious practices, including participation in religious services.

Community

Two California men who attacked a Sikh man, cutting his hair and causing the amputation of a finger, were convicted of hate crimes.

A New Jersey teacher was reinstated after his 2013 firing for giving a Bible to a curious student.

Other reads

Gallup shows Americans’ views of the Bible over last 40 years. In the latest survey, a record low of 24% believe it is the “actual word of God to be taken literally.”

The Wichita Eagle has an interesting analysis of the relationship between mental illness and religion.

The New York Times asks if Muslims have to be Democrats. Muslims face a dilemma between a Trump-led Republican party with Islamophobic overtones or a socially liberal Democratic party.

Mar 12: New immigration ban calls for data on honor killings, Senators request White House aid against Jewish hate crimes

Executive

Donald Trump signed a new executive order denying new visas to citizens of six Muslim-majority countries. Unlike the previous order, it excludes Iraq and sets out a process for people to apply for exceptions. In addition, it says the government will collect and publish data on violence against women by foreign nationals in the US, including “honor killings,” a term many see as referring to Muslims.

Hawaii filed a lawsuit against the new ban, maintaining that it violates religious freedom by targeting Muslims and that it damages Hawaii’s economic interests. Five other states are planning legal action.

The Marine Corps is considering criminal charges against a drill instructor whose harassment of a Muslim recruit allegedly led to the soldier’s death.

Legislative Branch

Responding to the threats of bombs and shooters at Jewish community centers that continued last week around the country, all 100 Senators signed a letter to the Attorney General, FBI Director and Secretary of Homeland Security calling for federal assistance in solving the growing problem.

As part of an announced religious freedom campaign after being detained in an airport last month, Muhammad Ali, Jr. spoke to House representatives who sit on a border security subcommittee. On his flight out of Washington, DC, he encountered delays at the airport again.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court declined to hear the landmark case on transgender restroom use that prompted numerous amicus briefs from religious groups. They sent the case back to the lower court.

The court denied a bid to block the Dakota Access Pipeline on religious grounds. The judge ruled that the religious freedom objection was brought up too late.

50 States

The Kentucky legislature passed a bill guaranteeing the rights of students at public education institutions to express religious and political views, including through school newspapers and PA systems. The bill was prompted by a dispute over a school production of Charlie Brown’s Christmas, which includes a passage from the Gospel of Luke.

Muslim students visiting the office of Oklahoma state representative John Bennett were asked to fill out a form asking questions purportedly about their religion such as “Do you beat your wife?”

South Dakota’s governor signed the legislation passed last week protecting religious adoption agencies that do not place children with same-sex couples.

Other reads

Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch’s record on religion, abortion and reproductive rights leans conservative, and has generally been upheld by the higher court.

Contemporary attempts by some critics to dismiss Islam as a religion have their roots in older anti-Catholic and anti-Mormon movements in America.