Aug 20: Faith leaders react to Charlottesville and Trump’s response

Executive Branch

Company executives resigned from Donald Trump’s business councils, leading to the dissolution of three advisory bodies, over his response to the Charlottesville protests last week. The evangelical advisory council, on the other hand, has seen relatively little turmoil. Only one pastor, of a New York megachurch, resigned.

The protests, which included KKK members and neo-Nazis, have alarmed Jewish groups. Some who have not previously criticized Trump, like Ivanka’s rabbi and Republican Jewish organizations, spoke out against his response to the protests and subsequent attack.

The Atlantic ran a piece analyzing the connection between white nationalism, racism and anti-Semitism. It tries to explain why people protesting the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue would chant “Jews will not replace us!

The State Department released its International Religious Freedom Report for 2016.

Judicial Branch

A federal court upheld Nebraska laws preventing picketing at funerals. The issue was raised by the Westboro Baptist Church, which pickets the funerals of military personnel with signs saying the deaths were caused by the legalization of gay marriage.

22 states filed an amicus brief supporting a New Mexico city’s appeal to the Supreme Court. The case is over a display of the Ten Commandments, which a lower court ruled must be removed.

Legislative Branch

4,000 religious leaders signed a letter asking Congress to maintain the Johnson Amendment, which revokes tax-exemptions for non-profits that endorse political candidates.

50 States

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that the state welfare agency can’t vaccinate children in their custody over their parents’ religious objections.

Pew Research documented every reference to God in US state constitutions. The divine is referred to in all 50, most frequently in the Massachusetts constitution with 12 mentions.

The Guardian profiled the controversial Church of Cannabis in Denver.

Other reads

The Washington Post described what different faith traditions say their adherents should do when an eclipse occurs.

Aug 13: Trump still silent on mosque bombing, threatens “fire and fury” against North Korea

Executive Branch

Donald Trump faced criticism for his silence on the bombing of a mosque in Minnesota last week.

Trump’s threat to meet North Korea with “fire and fury” was seen by some as a religious invocation. It speaks to a larger split between the right and the left on reading the Biblical God as benevolent or authoritarian.

Judicial Branch

Both a meatpacking plant and the Teamsters union representing its employees were charged with civil rights violations for discrimination against Muslim workers. The workers were told to choose between their religion and their jobs.

50 States

Long Beach, California, settled a federal discrimination lawsuit filed by a Muslim woman whose hijab was removed by a male police office after she was arrested.

Native American tribes in Oregon filed a federal lawsuit over a highway-widening project that destroyed a sacred site. The tribes argue that the construction was a violation of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Rastafarian and Native religious groups in California continue to use cannabis in religious ceremonies without a license, attracting the attention of law enforcement.

Other reads

Forbes covered the research on religion’s impact on a company’s bottom line. Firms that are located in more religious counties, or have more religious executives, perform better.

ProPublica profiled Sikhs in America, who have been targeted for astonishing hate crimes since 1907.

New research investigated the relationship between religious conservatism and economic conservatism.