Sep 3: Day of Prayer for Houston, Travel Ban Affects Hajj

Executive Branch

Donald Trump declared September 3rd as a National Day of Prayer for victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Muslims in Saudi Arabia for the hajj expressed concern about reentering the US under the Trump travel ban. Many Muslims chose to delay their pilgrimage until the situation is more certain.

The State Department announced a consolidation of positions and offices related to religion and religious freedom. The special envoy on anti-Semitism will remain, but the envoys to Muslim communities and the Organization of Islamic Countries will be discontinued.

Judicial Branch

The 8th Circuit upheld a lower court’s ruling that Lincoln, Nebraska, can ban the distribution of religious literature outside of a sports arena.

50 States

Illinois passed a law creating a Muslim American Advisory Council.

Community

The New York Times ran a profile of an Arkansas man who helped vandalize a Mosque and the Muslim community leaders who forgave him.

Other reads

The Wheatley Institution at BYU posted about social science research that indicates a positive relationship between religiosity and family life, including quality of fatherhood and outcomes for children.

A Pew survey found that Protestants have started to believe some of the same Catholic theological tenets that prompted the Reformation. Key among these is the role of works in salvation and the doctrinal validity of extra-scriptural church teachings.

Jul 2: Supreme Court rules churches are eligible for government funds, agrees to hear case of cake for gay wedding

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Trinity Lutheran Church in a case over a church’s eligibility for grants from the state for secular purposes. The issue at hand was a state grant to resurface playgrounds. The case could have significant implications for other instances of government funds ending up with religious organizations.

The Supreme Court vacated rulings of lower courts in New Mexico and Colorado on the provision of public vouchers and textbook lending to religious schools. The cases were sent back to the lower courts.

The Supreme Court agreed to hear the case of a Denver baker who refused to sell a wedding cake to a gay couple.

The Supreme Court significantly narrowed the injunctions on Donald Trump’s travel ban, allowing the executive order to block the entry of foreigners from the six listed countries who have no “bona fide” relationship with persons in the US. It also agreed to hear the challenges to the ban, accepting appeals from the 5th and 9th Circuit Courts.

Executive Branch

A new Justice Department report found that only 54% of hate crimes from 2011-2015 were reported.

50 States

A Ten Commandments monument was installed at the Arkansas State Capitol. The ACLU announced plans to sue for its removal. The monument was destroyed by a vandal less than 24 hours after installation.

The Georgia Supreme Court ruled that the state constitution is not violated when donors get tax credit for donating money that ends up at religious schools. Under Georgia law, taxpayers who owe taxes can get credit for paying what they owe by instead donating to nonprofit organizations that provide scholarships to students. Some of those students attend religious schools.

A Florida court held that religious schools can require all students to be immunized, even if they have religious objections.

Community

Jewish marchers were asked to leave a parade the day before Pride Day in Chicago because they carried “Jewish Pride” flags, which incorporated the Star of David. The organizers interpreted the flags as symbols of Palestinian oppression.

Other reads

A new survey was released on the tension between religious freedom and sexual freedom, and which Americans think should be preferred. 48% said religious freedom is more important, while 24% said sexual freedom is. 20% said that religious believers are motivated by hate in disputes over sexuality.

Are CrossFit gyms and yoga studios filling the church gap for non-religious people?

BuzzFeed looks at what clothes people from different faiths wear to worship.

 

Apr 9: Gorsuch confirmed to Supreme Court, House hearing on 1st Amendment at college

Judicial Branch

The Senate confirmed Neil Gorsuch to fill Antonin Scalia’s vacant Supreme Court seat. Republicans used the “nuclear option,” permanently altering Senate rules to circumvent a filibuster of a Supreme Court nominee. This effectively reduced the number of votes required to confirm a Supreme Court nominee from 60 to 51.

Gorsuch will have an immediate impact on the court as it decides high-profile cases, including several on religion.

The 7th Circuit ruled that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT individuals from workplace discrimination. It found that Kimberly Hively was illegally passed over for a full-time job because of her sexual orientation.

The ruling is at odds with an 11th Circuit ruling from March that found no legal protection for a security guard who was fired for her sexual orientation.

Legislative Branch

The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the First Amendment on college campuses. It included a testimony on restrictions of religious freedom, particularly regarding religious clubs and their ability to apply religious tests for membership or leadership roles.

Executive Branch

The Department of Justice’s new crime reduction task force will have a subcommittee on preventing hate crimes. Reported hate crimes have spiked in the past year, including a 67% increase in hate crimes against Muslim Americans.

The Trump Administration has still not made appointments to high-profile positions related to religion. These include the Office of Faith-Based and Community Partnerships and the Ambassador-at-Large for Religious Freedom.

50 States

The Washington Supreme Court remanded a case for retrial because of improperly handling of religion and sexual orientation in child custody. The parents concerned raised their children as conservative Christians, which led to conflict when the mother came out as lesbian and they divorced. The higher court held that Washington case law disallows the use of the mother’s sexual orientation in custody determinations, independent of any potential conflict with the children’s religious convictions.

Montana governor Steve Bullock vetoed legislation banning foreign laws from being used in the Montana court system. Although the bill did not mention Sharia law, the debate in the legislature indicated that banning Islamic jurisprudence was one of its primary intentions.

The Arkansas legislature passed a similar piece of legislation implicitly banning Sharia law by forbidding the use of foreign laws.