Aug 27: SPLC sued by Christian ministry over hate group label, Justice Department downplays religious freedom EO

Judicial Branch

The Southern Poverty Law Center is well known for its documentation of hate groups. Its profiles of white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups have been widely cited in coverage of the Charlottesville violence.

The SPLC created a controversy this last year by including Christian organizations in its list of hate groups because of their opposition to same-sex relationships. This last week the SPLC was sued by a Presbyterian ministries company in a federal court for defamation because it listed the company as a hate group.

The SPLC lists are used by other companies, like Amazon and charity tracker Guidestar, to blacklist organizations that support causes of hate.

The 9th Circuit ruled against a public high school football coach who lost his position after continuing to pray on the field after games.

A federal judge granted a pipeline company access to land owned by an order of Catholic nuns. The nuns had argued that as part of their order of Adorers of Christ, they must preserve the sacredness of the earth. The judge ruled that they failed to demonstrate how the pipeline would disrupt the practice of their religion.

Executive Branch

The Justice Department defended Donald Trump’s executive order on religious freedom by saying it actually didn’t change anything.

The Justice Department also filed briefs defending the ACA birth control mandate and the Johnson Amendment prohibiting religious endorsement of political candidates, despite Trump’s executive orders not to enforce those same laws.

A group of Jewish leaders decided to cancel an annual call with the White House because of Donald Trump’s statements about the conservative rallies and violence in Charlottesville, which included public demonstrations of anti-Semitism.

Members of Trump’s evangelical advisory council resisted strong pressure to resign in the wake of his comments about Charlottesville.

50 States

A Wisconsin court ruled that a Christian photographer who does not work at same-sex weddings did not violate anti-discrimination laws because she does not have a physical storefront.

A devil-worshipping couple filed suit against an Oklahoma school district for religious discrimination against their children. The couple follows Anramainyu, a form of Zoroastrian devil worship.

Community

Muslim groups are turning to Jewish organizations to learn how to protect themselves from hate crimes. Mosque and Islamic center security is a particular focus. 

Aug 20: Faith leaders react to Charlottesville and Trump’s response

Executive Branch

Company executives resigned from Donald Trump’s business councils, leading to the dissolution of three advisory bodies, over his response to the Charlottesville protests last week. The evangelical advisory council, on the other hand, has seen relatively little turmoil. Only one pastor, of a New York megachurch, resigned.

The protests, which included KKK members and neo-Nazis, have alarmed Jewish groups. Some who have not previously criticized Trump, like Ivanka’s rabbi and Republican Jewish organizations, spoke out against his response to the protests and subsequent attack.

The Atlantic ran a piece analyzing the connection between white nationalism, racism and anti-Semitism. It tries to explain why people protesting the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue would chant “Jews will not replace us!

The State Department released its International Religious Freedom Report for 2016.

Judicial Branch

A federal court upheld Nebraska laws preventing picketing at funerals. The issue was raised by the Westboro Baptist Church, which pickets the funerals of military personnel with signs saying the deaths were caused by the legalization of gay marriage.

22 states filed an amicus brief supporting a New Mexico city’s appeal to the Supreme Court. The case is over a display of the Ten Commandments, which a lower court ruled must be removed.

Legislative Branch

4,000 religious leaders signed a letter asking Congress to maintain the Johnson Amendment, which revokes tax-exemptions for non-profits that endorse political candidates.

50 States

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that the state welfare agency can’t vaccinate children in their custody over their parents’ religious objections.

Pew Research documented every reference to God in US state constitutions. The divine is referred to in all 50, most frequently in the Massachusetts constitution with 12 mentions.

The Guardian profiled the controversial Church of Cannabis in Denver.

Other reads

The Washington Post described what different faith traditions say their adherents should do when an eclipse occurs.

Aug 13: Trump still silent on mosque bombing, threatens “fire and fury” against North Korea

Executive Branch

Donald Trump faced criticism for his silence on the bombing of a mosque in Minnesota last week.

Trump’s threat to meet North Korea with “fire and fury” was seen by some as a religious invocation. It speaks to a larger split between the right and the left on reading the Biblical God as benevolent or authoritarian.

Judicial Branch

Both a meatpacking plant and the Teamsters union representing its employees were charged with civil rights violations for discrimination against Muslim workers. The workers were told to choose between their religion and their jobs.

50 States

Long Beach, California, settled a federal discrimination lawsuit filed by a Muslim woman whose hijab was removed by a male police office after she was arrested.

Native American tribes in Oregon filed a federal lawsuit over a highway-widening project that destroyed a sacred site. The tribes argue that the construction was a violation of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Rastafarian and Native religious groups in California continue to use cannabis in religious ceremonies without a license, attracting the attention of law enforcement.

Other reads

Forbes covered the research on religion’s impact on a company’s bottom line. Firms that are located in more religious counties, or have more religious executives, perform better.

ProPublica profiled Sikhs in America, who have been targeted for astonishing hate crimes since 1907.

New research investigated the relationship between religious conservatism and economic conservatism.

Aug 6: Hillary to preach, the rise of Christian litigation

(Not-quite) Executive Branch

Hillary Clinton is planning to become more public about her Methodist faith. There are hints that she may do some preaching as well.

Judicial Branch

The Third Circuit ruled that individuals who object to contraceptives on religious grounds do not need to be given the option to purchase insurance that doesn’t cover contraceptives.

50 States

An Alabama appellate court refused to order that a judge recuse himself from a case because of his religion. The judge is also a preacher at a fundamentalist Christian church, and is hearing a case over child custody where the mother is lesbian.

Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice said that Islam is a false religion, and is in opposition to the First Amendment. He is running for the Senate.

Community

An undocumented Connecticut mother who sought asylum from her native Guatemala twenty years ago left the church where she sought sanctuary. She was there for more than two weeks, until a court granted a stay on her deportation.

Although few undocumented immigrants seek refuge at churches, the number of congregations offering sanctuary has dramatically increased under the Trump administration.

Other reads

The Deseret News reported on conservative organizations that litigate religious freedom cases on behalf of Christians. They have attracted both praise and criticism, with some fellow conservatives maintaining that some aggressive public relations and legal tactics damage the image of religious freedom.

Christians are more than twice as likely as others to say that a person is poor because of a lack of effort.

The Deseret News reported on a new survey of millennials showing that they are more secular and less concerned about religious freedom.