Jun 18: Hand scanner and the mark of the devil, Lyle Jeffs arrested

Judicial Branch

The Fourth Circuit ruled in favor of a Christian coal miner who objected to his company’s use of a biometric hand scanner. He believes the scanner imparts the Mark of the Beast from the Book of Revelation. The company accommodated two employees with hand injuries but refused to give an exception to the plaintiff, so he left the company. The employer’s defense argued that the plaintiff’s interpretation of the Bible was incorrect, and should have allowed him to use his left hand.

The Supreme Court case last week exempting religious hospital systems from pension regulations didn’t fully resolve the issue. The Court ruled that “principal-purpose” organizations qualify for an exemption, but did not address whether or not the plaintiffs qualified as principal-purpose organizations.

Executive Branch

Lyle Jeffs, leader of the Fundamentalist Latter-Day Saints, was captured by the FBI after a year on the run. He is wanted in connection with a food stamp fraud case. Jeffs is the younger brother of Warren Jeffs, his predecessor as leader of the polygamist Mormon sect.

President Trump’s proposed tax reforms could significantly reduce charitable giving, including to religious organizations.

Other reads

A new paper breaks down political affiliations of clergy across faiths. It finds that the clergy are more partisan than their members.

The LA Times ran a story about what it is like to live as a Sikh at a time when they are increasingly targeted in hate crimes.

Jun 11: Marches against Sharia, Supreme Court upholds pension exception for religious hospitals

National

ACT for America, a conservative national security grassroots organization, staged Marches Against Sharia across the US on Saturday. The group was protesting the supposed infiltration of Islamic law into American jurisprudence.

That claim – along with others touted by marchers, such as wild accusations of bestiality – is refuted by experts.

Most cities with marches saw counter-protests calling for tolerance and condemning ACT as Islamophobic.  A number of protests got physical and arrests were made in several states.

Judicial Branch

The Supreme Court ruled 8-0 in favor of religious hospital systems claiming exemptions from federal pension fund requirements. They were being sued by former employees who argued that the hospital networks should have complied with the ERISA law protecting employees with pension plans.

The Supreme Court declined to hear a religious freedom suit filed by a Marine. After being court-martialed on several offenses, she appealed over her conviction for disobeying orders to remove bible verses from her desk. Lower courts ruled against her.

Executive Branch

President Trump spoke at the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a conservative evangelical political organization. He said that he and evangelicals are under siege, and touted his Supreme Court nomination and executive orders on religion as steps in the right direction.

The Atlantic ran a profile of the man running the Health and Human Services Office of Civil Rights. He is religious, conservative, and the son of Colombian immigrants. His office oversees language, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation cases related to healthcare.

Secretary Ben Carson spoke at the Religious Liberty Dinner at the Newseum Institute’s Religious Freedom Center. He discussed the rights of private citizens and businesses to act according to their beliefs.

Congress

Bernie Sanders drew attention for his intense questioning at a senate confirmation hearing. He argued that the belief that members of other religions are condemned before God makes a nominee unable to serve all Americans fairly.

50 States

A District Court in Florida ruled against a Christian school that was denied the use of a stadium loudspeaker to broadcast prayers at a football championship game. The school claimed that freedoms of speech and religion were violated, while the court held that allowing use of the loudspeaker would have been state endorsement of religion.

A Montana court struck down a state rule eliminating tax credits for donations to religious school scholarships.

Other reads

Number of megachurches by state.

Jun 4: Ramadan begins, Trump administration drafts religious exception for healthcare

Executive Branch

President Trump was criticized for his statement marking the beginning of Ramadan. The critics argued that the statement focused more on terrorism than on the Islamic month of fasting.

Muslims in New York City held an iftar, the meal at dusk that ends a day of Ramadan fasting, outside of Trump Tower in protest of the President’s policies and rhetoric.

A draft regulation by the Trump administration on birth control was leaked. The regulation would provide a religious exemption to the requirement that employers provide birth control to employees.

Judicial Branch

A Chinese man seeking asylum in the US for religious persecution in China filed an appeal to the Supreme Court. He lost his case after the Tenth Circuit used a narrow definition of persecution that did not include his circumstances.

A Michigan farmer filed suit against a farmer’s market religious discrimination. He rents out his orchard for weddings but not to same-sex couples, which puts him in violation of a city ordinance. As a result, he was kicked out of the East Lansing farmer’s market.

Two cases alleging discrimination in zoning rules were settled in New Jersey. Five years of litigation and a federal investigation concluded with the local mosque able to build according to its proposal.

Community

Alan Dershowitz has joined the legal team defending a Detroit doctor accused of female genital cutting. They will mount a religious freedom defense, saying that the doctor’s actions were religious in nature and protected by the First Amendment.

A Michigan school canceled released-time Bible classes after an activist group filed a complaint.

Other reads

The First Liberty Institute released a report entitled “Undeniable: A Survey of Hostility to Religion in America.” It documents over 1200 cases of alleged religious discrimination, most of which were litigated in court.

CNN investigated Donald Trump’s religious background to try to understand what religious beliefs he has, if any, and how they might impact his presidency.

Buzzfeed examined the phenomenon of Christian health care sharing ministries, which offer an alternative to health insurance. They have lower premiums as a result of less regulatory oversight, allowing less comprehensive coverage.